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Observer Effect and Entanglement are Practically Requirements of Programmed Reality Options
jim
Posted: Tuesday, January 24, 2012 11:02:20 PM

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I'm kind of excited by my latest blog post. Hope you all agree.

I started thinking about experimental ways to validate or invalidate Programmed Reality. Sort of have some ideas, but they definitely need a little time to work through.

At the same time, however, I considered what might be the effects of developing an efficient universe simulation. And came to the conclusion that some Quantum Mechanics effects are almost inevitable:

http://blog.theuniversesolved.com/2012/01/24/the-observer-effect-and-entanglement-are-practically-requirements-of-programmed-reality/

Doesn't prove anything, of course. Proofs don't exist in science. Yet, it feels one step closer to a strong theory.
EKUMA1981
Posted: Thursday, January 26, 2012 7:03:44 PM
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Jim, can you please post more blogs like this, they're fab! Other examples ("evidence") would be appreciated.
Guillermo
Posted: Monday, February 06, 2012 3:22:24 AM

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Quote:
Let’s say we zoom in on two particles at the same time; two that are in close proximity to each other. Both would have to be decohered by the Program. The decoherence would result in the creation of two mini finite state machines. Using the same random number seed for both will cause the state machines to forever behave in an identical manner.

No matter how far apart you take the particles. i.e…

Entanglement!


What a Brilliant Blog Post!

"We are living in a computer programmed reality."
- Philip K. Dick, 1977
jim
Posted: Friday, February 17, 2012 4:28:51 PM

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Thanks, Guillermo and EKUMA1981. So glad you liked it!
RogerV
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2012 3:10:48 PM
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Reading this lead me to recall the computer game Age of Empires that my kids played back in the late '90s. It was one of those world simulations where you expand the territory that you control and are civilizing. There was a game view of the entire area that was known. If you started to advance into some unknown area, then the game would take a moment or two to generate that on the fly, meshing it in with the simulated reality that was already known through direct observation.

It's an obvious economizing approach to take when designing a virtual reality game to run on finite resources of memory and CPU compute power. Don't generate and sustain more detailed reality than what is necessary; where 'necessary' is defined by what comes under observation, and 'observation' is defined by the view point of the game player - i.e., the conscious awareness of the game player.

Is reality the product of well crafted design or is it the product of blind random forces that self organize over time into the cosmos ('cosmos' means order)?

If reality is the product of being designed, then we might well expect it to have characteristics that speak to a principle of engineering economy. Well, we certainly employ a principle of economy in our own engineering endeavors as we're always having to balance the design against some manner of constraints.

Does God (where 'God' stands in as the term to be applied to whatever agency is the designer/engineer of reality) have any such constraints?

Also, is the universe we observe generated on the fly to satisfy the need of our having performed observation - to a greater and more detailed extent? Is it all really out there independently existing apart from ourselves? Or is like a game of asteroids and the universe at large is whipped up as needed?

Now this is an idle thought but considered it might make for a humorous sci-fi short story in the hands of someone with talent for such.

As our telescopes such as Hubble, Chandra, et al, peer further into the universe and resolve in more detail, do we run the risk of crashing the system?

After all, if we're executing on a Windows OS, we might get a blue screen of death once the paging swap file is full. The universe ends not in a bang or a whimper, but a general protection fault.

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