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Strange Computer Code Discovered Concealed In Superstring Equations! Options
ebb101
Posted: Saturday, March 24, 2012 5:29:40 AM
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Claude Shannon's code found in Superstring Equations
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1LCVknKUJ4
EKUMA1981
Posted: Sunday, March 25, 2012 8:56:46 AM
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You've struck gold with this one, ebb101. As I understand it is an "error-correction" code that has been discovered. So, it's probably keeping the universe glitch-free.

And, first time I've heard about "doubly-even self-dual linear binary error-correcting block code" and the concept of Adinkras.

I hope more "evidence" is unearthed very soon.

Tracy
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 3:02:52 PM
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Didn't get a chance to watch the vid 'til yesterday, as the economy seems to worsen work seems to take up more and more of my time, seems kind of backwards. Eh?
This is crazy, I want to learn more about it. I want to know all the gory details.

There was one reply there I liked, something to the effect of, "Why create ancestor simulations? Did they screw something up?"
(You did know The Archon created backup Universes didn't you? In case something went wrong with the whole transhuman evolutionary process. They were, after all, coming upon 'the point of no return', it started about 4.5 billion years ago (as far as we can tell).)
There was another reply, something about assembly. I used to know a little C/C++, no more (they say if you don't use it you lose it.). Tried to learn some assembly, I quit when just looking at assembly gave me severe migranes. Brick wall

Somehow finding binary code in symetry and string theory, although crazy, would make sense to me.
But then again, I'm not the brightest bulb in the box.

ebb101, you crazy.
Neo
Posted: Tuesday, March 27, 2012 6:35:38 PM
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Oh wowAnxious d'oh! Think

I've been on here interrmittantly of late, and started a thread with that video just a few minutes ago. Then I decided to have a look round the recent posts, something which I haven't done it a while. Bit of a 'wow' moment, then, to come across a thread based on the exact same video!!!

There is no spoon.
Tracy
Posted: Wednesday, March 28, 2012 2:20:27 PM
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George Noory would say. "There are no coincidences."
I say brilliant minds, like ebb101 and Neo, think alike.
I want to know more about this, it's the most interesting news I've heard on the subject in some time.
If true it would totally prove symmetry and string theory.
ebb101
Posted: Thursday, March 29, 2012 3:42:04 AM
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For some reason, I thought of these words from "A River Runs Through It," when I watched the video:

"The river was cut by the world's great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of the rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs.
I am haunted by waters.”
jim
Posted: Sunday, April 01, 2012 1:36:12 PM

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Yeah, this is an awesome find, ebb101. Thanks so much for posting.

I definitely want to look into it more. My first reaction is that string theory is not a natural emergent representation of reality, but rather a man-made construct designed to model all of known physics. As such, it could easily have some patterns to the equations that resemble some other man-made patterns, such as error correction codes. Now, if he found these codes in pi or e (a la Carl Sagan's "Contact"), something that emerges FROM our reality, it would be really significant. That said, he is obviously a smart guy and appears to see the significance here, so let's dig further!

I found the article that he referred to as being the only article at the "popular level". You can read it here:
http://being.publicradio.org/programs/2012/codes-for-reality/gates-symbolsofpower.shtml
RogerV
Posted: Monday, April 02, 2012 5:17:42 PM
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Of course nature (the cosmos) provides well known examples of error correction that are very comparable to techniques used in digital binary computing:

Quote:
DNA codes own error correction

DNA's double helix consists of two twisted molecular strands bound together by hydrogen bonds. The four building blocks of each strand are called nucleotides. Their names are adenine, thymine, cytosine and guanine, and are abbreviated to A, T, C and G.

These four stick together very selectively: A to T, and C to G. A binds to T by two hydrogen bonds, and C sticks to G by three. Other pairings are possible, but they distort the DNA strands. Error-correcting enzymes look out for such mismatches when DNA is replicated.

Mac Dónaill argues that the nucleotides' pairings are a kind of code. Each hydrogen bond has two components: chemical groups called donors and acceptors. If we denote a donor as 1 and an acceptor as 0, then C encodes the pattern 100, and G is 011.

In other words, each nucleotide can be represented as a short sequence of binary code, like the 1's and 0's used to record information in computers.

There is one more element in this code. A and G belong to a class of molecule called purines, and T and C are pyrimidines. Each pairing involves a purine and a pyrimidine. We can denote a purine by 0 and a pyrimidine by 1. Then C becomes 100,1 and G is 011,0.

Represented in this way, says Mac Dónaill, the permissible combinations of A,C,T and G correspond to what computer scientists call a parity code. Each nucleotide has an even number of 1's - it is said to have an even parity.


Though not as analogous to the above example of parity checking is to digital computation methods, this backtracking and proof-reading transcription error correction technique is still interesting - interesting in that ultimately we're still dealing with an information construct and in the act of duplicating said information on a mass scale, techniques must be employed to correct errors that may arise. The same is done for when copying computer files in a file system or over a computer network (in such situations, different error correction schemes are in play at different levels of the stack of the implementation).

Quote:
Proofreading RNA: Structure of RNA Polymerase II's Backtracked State

This proofreading function plays an important role in minimizing transcription errors, speeding up protein production, and ensuring accuracy in the transition of the genetic code to the proteins that allow our bodies to function.
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