The Universe Solved

 


Welcome Guest Search | Active Topics | Members | Log In | Register

Coding for Quantum Computers Options
jim
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2012 9:43:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/19/2008
Posts: 898
Points: 2,700
Hey technology types, you might be interested in this...

D-Wave has a commercially available Quantum Computer. They also have a developer toolkit on their website that anyone can access, which has sample programs and tutorials for how to program in qubits:

http://www.dwavesys.com/en/dev-portal.html

Here's a shot of one of my colleagues giving it a try:



EKUMA1981
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2012 12:17:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/3/2011
Posts: 348
Points: 907
Location: Stockton-on-Tees, United Kingdom
But Jim, is this a genuine quantum computer or a conventional one. I know there's been a lot of controversy surrounding D-Wave Systems, so can you please clarify? Also, if it's the Real McCoy then wouldn't it outperform the most advanced supercomputers like K and Sequoia? I've heard Michio Kaku in the past mention that the best quantum computer could only manage to calculate 3 times 5= 15! So what's the truth to all this? Thanks Jim.
jim
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2012 8:29:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/19/2008
Posts: 898
Points: 2,700
Really great question, EKUMA1981. Near as I can tell, the D-Wave System is a bona fide quantum computer, although it uses a different method of creating qubits, or quantum states, than other researchers - hence the controversy and challenge. I thought that this IEEE article put it into perspective nicely, despite the unfortunate and biased title and over-simplified conclusion.

Fact is, quantum computers are good for a very different set of problems than conventional computers are, just like brains are well suited to solving a different set of problems from conventional computers. For example, traditional (von Neumann) computers are great at brute-force mathematical calculations and high precision, but terrible at pattern recognition, or any algorithm that is exponential in complexity. Brains are great at pattern recognition, but very slow and anything computational. Quantum computers are slow at traditional math calculations, but blazingly fast (theoretically) at things that require testing many states, or options, at once, such as cryptography.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS

Universe Solved Theme Created by Jim Elvidge (Universe Solved)
Powered by Yet Another Forum.net version 1.9.1.2 (NET v2.0) - 9/27/2007
Copyright © 2003-2006 Yet Another Forum.net. All rights reserved.
This page was generated in 0.067 seconds.